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Safe Trucking with Wildlife on the Road

This time of the year there is a lot of wildlife traveling. This means you are sharing the road with them. They don’t understand what a crosswalk is or ‘waiting till it is clear’ to cross the road. That means more caution needs to be used. Especially in ‘high traffic’ areas. Most highways do a good job of marking the more common areas but animals can come out anytime from anywhere. In Canada, an average of 20 people are killed each year because of this type of collision. Almost 2000 humans are injured and over 30,000 animals are killed each year.

It is important to know that animals are the most active at dawn and dusk or about 7pm to midnight. Although running into animals is not completely unavoidable there are steps you can take to decrease your chances of running into them and causing damage to yourself, others and your truck.

When possible, avoid driving at the highest risk times, when visibility is low such as dawn and dusk. If you must drive during these times pay special attention to the road and slow down.

When you do see animals on the side of road, slow down their behavior is always unpredictable. Many animals, such as deer, travel in herds. If there is one, there could be many more.

When you are on a wide road with little traffic, drive in the middle of the road when possible. Keep your high beams on and watch for forest areas and water sources where it might be more likely for animals to be.

If you are out on the road and an animal comes out without you seeing it be sure you know what to do, being prepared mentally can go a long way for your safety and the safety of the ones around you. First of all, do your best not to panic. If you have time, flash your lights and hit the horn this might scare the animal enough to get out of your way. If you cannot avoid hitting the animal, do not swerve suddenly, hit the animal head on if you have to hit it. Swerving suddenly while going a high speed could cause you to roll your vehicle or hit another vehicle around you. Hit the brakes as hard as you can and release them just before you make contact with the animal. This method could help to be sure the animal does not roll up your hood and through your windshield.

Although hitting on the animals is not completely unavoidable, there are steps you can take to help reduce the risk. Slow down and pay attention to the signs on the road.

RESOURCES
https://www.nsds.ca/b/tips-for-safe-trucking-in-wildlife-areas

https://www.wildlifecollisions.ca/hints.htm

https://blog.bisontransport.com/2014/12/6-must-know-winter-wildlife-driving-tips/

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